Thin Venison Steaks
Thin Venison Steaks
Venison steaks are so delicious, but only when they’re cooked right. The problem is they’re so darn thin, it’s way to easy to overcook them. That is, until you found this recipe!
Thin Venison Steaks
Thin Venison Steaks
Venison steaks are so delicious, but only when they’re cooked right. The problem is they’re so darn thin, it’s way to easy to overcook them. That is, until you found this recipe!
Prep Time
30Minutes
Cook Time
1Minute
Prep Time
30Minutes
Cook Time
1Minute
Ingredients
  • Venison Steaks
  • Balsamic Vinegar
  • Olive Oil
  • Rosemary
Instructions
  1. Place the thinly cut steaks in a bowl. Mix equal parts balsamic vinegar and olive oil in the bowl, just until the steaks are covered.
  2. Mix in crushed rosemary.
  3. Cover bowl with plastic, and let sit in room temperature for 30 minutes to an hour. The point isn’t to necessarily bring it up to room temperature; in fact, doing so can make it cook way too fast. With that said, if your house is hot, stash the bowl in a cool place.
  4. When it’s time to grill or pan fry the steaks, drain them of the vinegar and oil mix.
  5. Sprinkle steaks with cracked pepper, but no salt; salt will dry out the thin steaks.
  6. Now, you have a choice of using a grill or pan frying the steaks. Either way, you need to know the heat settings so that you can control it at around medium-high heat. My grill cooks extremely hot on the right side, which would leave these steaks burned, even for the short period of time that they are cooked.
  7. If you’re going to grill the steaks, spray them with a light coating of oil spray. If you’re going to pan sear them, just dribble a little olive oil (or butter) in the pan.
  8. Place the steaks on the grill or in the pan and press down on them, firmly, with a spatula. You only need to press down for a couple seconds per steak.
  9. After 30 seconds, flip the steaks over, press down on them with the spatula, and cook for another 30 seconds.
  10. Take them off the grill or out of the pan, foil tent them on a cutting board, and wait 5 minutes before cutting into them. The meat should still be perfectly pink all the way through – a tasty medium-rare.
Recipe Notes

I live at an elevation of 8,800 feet and the steaks I cook are usually ¼” thick, so the timing above works perfectly for a nice, thin, medium-rare steak. In fact, I’ve tested it to 45 seconds and a minute on each side and they turned out too dry and overcooked. Also, I only use cast iron or cast enamel, which I feel, gives the steaks a lot of added flavor and a beautiful sear.

Is anyone else craving steak now? I am.